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Don’t look at me

Why Maria Sharapova’s Rivalry With Serena Williams Echoes The Practiced Fragility of White Women

Maria Sharapova has a new book titled: Unstoppable: My Life So Far — and in it — the leggy blonde known more for her endorsement deals than her impressive prowess on the tennis court — provided more details about her awkwardly dramatic relationship with Serena Williams.

I won’t hide the fact that I’m not at all a fan of Sharapova. It’s kind of the same way I feel whenever Taylor Swift is mentioned. Both women enhance the narrative of their existence that stems from how we view the purity of White women versus the rougher shell of Black women.

Black women are no match for the delicate features that White women utilize to express their fragility. I’ve been in heightened situations at the workplace that resulted in somewhat serious scenarios. My reaction is to maintain composure until the problem is resolved. When the White co-worker breaks down — she is comforted — and automatically garners more empathy and trust.

This reliance that centers around the brutish qualities of Black people — stems from the belief that we’re somehow created to withstand high doses of pain and torture. This ridiculous theory has been explored countless times — and the results verify why Whites think that Blacks — are “superhuman.”

This ploy by the White and privileged — to define the moment when a Black child’s life is violently stolen by an adult in uniform — is the oldest trick in the book of lies. The casual grimace of watching the child you shot in the stomach — bleed to death — as you concoct the image of a grown up man charging at you with a pistol — for your guiltless security.

Tamir Rice was only twelve-years-old — and yet the officer that killed him— was almost certain that he was decades older — with the menacing posture that is typically labeled on anyone of color who dares to be taller than a toddler.

Maria Sharapova’s obsession with Serena Williams — the superhuman athlete that she managed to defeat once — back in 2004 — is a calculating admission — that gives the author the audacity to make silly excuses about why she was never able to measure up to her arch nemesis.

Sharapova acknowledges the formidability of the world champion she used to secretly watch back in Florida — when Serena held practice sessions with older sister — Venus.

Then things get quite sticky as Sharapova illustrates the mightiness of Williams’ controversial template. The mission is to exaggerate the “thickness of the arms and legs” and how “really tall” she appears when in actuality — the author is at least five inches taller than the “grown woman” she who claims wept with sorrowful regret in the locker room — after she was defeated by the “skinny kid.”

There is also the matter of Sharapova alluding to how much more advanced and mature Williams was when they played their first match. And even now, Sharapova, who famously spent part of her 15-month suspension for doping — enrolled at Harvard Business School — still admits that the Black athlete who was too Black to defeat — still “makes her feel like a little girl.”

Remarkably, Williams is only about six years older than Sharapova.

That and the fact that Williams has endured societal lashings of disapproval when it comes to her body image. The media has only helped to reinforce the stereotypes of desirability between the two lifelong competitors. The images selected for Sharapova — showcase her femininity and her skillful prance around the court she rarely dominates. Williams is usually displayed with arrogance — and a mouth agape with the breath of a dragon.

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beauty and the beast?

A creature who must win at all costs. Even if it makes a skinny, adorably-lithe White girl scared to death at the prospect of entering the lair that could devour her — due to the immensity of her foe.

These fantastical tales give power to the magic that is paired with negroes — to give validity to the claim that Whites are just naturally more superior — and in the areas where they fail or don’t shine as bright — there is a very good reason why this happens.

Black people are built to last. They are able to withstand a higher threshold of pain and suffering. You can empty your gun of bullets and still need more — because the Blackness of skin is tougher and requires heavier chains and bolts— not to mention stacks of magazines that will minimize loading time.

Blacks are built to take it. They don’t recoil quietly — they get up and fight until the bleeding passes the gutters. They are made to be perishable — even with the powers they wield. A Black toddler can watch the man of her care succumb to the wounds sustained in the battle field she dwells in.

Black can be too Black and when that happens — White people have no choice but to use that as weaponry

Sharapova is certainly not Unstoppable — but she clearly thinks she’s dope enough to write about how dope she is — even after being publicly disgraced for being a dope.

Sharapova makes it easy to despise her because of her constant need for attention — and the way she manipulates the truth for the benefit of emerging relatable — as she sinks into the victimhood and sainthood of the fragile White Princess that had to overcome a shitload of shit to make it to the other side.

But there is no comparison when you consider the insurmountable hurdles Serena Williams had to conquer in order to remain undefeated — even as the racist chants pummeled off her impenetrable armor. Williams is a Black woman with features that White women purchase — but when it comes to the weight of a serve that means a hell of a lot more than glossy campaign ads — these women would rather be White — and leave the heavy lifting to their Black counterparts.

Maria Sharapova wants us to believe that she failed to win over Serena Williams in more than ways than one — but mainly because of her stance as a human with limits — who had to face off with a superhuman — outfitted in a bulky suit — and the attitude of a winner.

The fragility of White women is a global practice that makes Black women appear as the aggressors in situations that don’t depict such behavior. We know that if Sandra Bland had been a White woman with an attitude to boot — she wouldn’t have been thrown out of her own car and tossed in jail. We know that if Serena Williams had been caught doping — she would be stripped of more than just the loss of endorsements. Her status as a disgraced Black woman brought to her knees by fate — would be beyond resuscitation.

Sharapova’s reasoning behind her never-ending feud with the one of the world’s greatest living athlete — seems to encompass a superficiality that is dredged from making Williams appear larger than she really is — while alluding to a grand personality — that when coupled — can be grossly distracting — and intimidating.

This is a practice that allows for the slaughter of Black children — who are not permitted the same freedom their much smaller and finely-boned counterparts enjoy. This is why Black men and women are tossed against concrete walls before hitting the stoney surface of the ground — with the force that is reserved for a superhuman who fights to live another day.

It was shitty of Sharapova to reduce Williams to a rabid dog — with a bark deadly enough to prevent cowards from owning the courts of opinion — when the ball hits and the champion grabs her trophy with her “large” hands — while standing “really tall” with pride.

But, it will always be the comeback to keep the frailty of White women intact as Black women continue to be exploited and replenished by the spirit of toughness that makes us larger-than-life.

That’s why superhumans — are human.

Written by

Juggling Wordsmith. I have a lot to say! https://medium.com/membership https://www.patreon.com/Ezziegirl

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