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Thanks To Kim Kardashian The Fashion Industry is Now a Laughable Weakling

Anyone who thinks it’s utterly ludicrous to witness Kim Kardashian West being bequeathed the first-ever Influencer Award from the CFDA (Council of Fashion Designers of America) — has to be diagnosed completely sane.

When it was first announced that the sex tape mixer turned global It girl was going to be given the historical honor — there were rumblings from insiders who couldn’t figure out why such a thing would be endorsed by those who supposedly know better.

But — the chairman of the CFDA — legendary designer Diane von Furstenberg offered up her reasoning behind the controversial choice:

“How can you ignore this world, right?” “I’m happy to do it. She’s a good girl.”

Yes — the industry has readily endorsed Kardashian West beyond her wildest dreams — and the approvals are streaming from the unlikeliest places — including icons like Bethann Hardison — who embodied a time when model scouts existed and new discoveries were refreshing and new without the burden of timelines and noisy followers.

“We’re no longer this little private island; now it’s understandable that anything goes. I like the family, Kris [Jenner] and all of them. The girls have been raised very well, and they’ve built something very organically, so good on them.”

For her part — the reality TV star who furnished her family with a multi-million dollar empire — graciously accepted her award by acknowledging the irony of being recognized as an “influencer of style” when you consider that she’s known for being “naked most of the time.”

Kardashian West also went on to extend her sincere thanks to designers like Olivier Rousteing from Balmain who has become her closest ally — due to his generosity and willingness to accommodate her world-famous derriere by saving her from the punishment of sample sizes — and “making clothes to fit her curves” — which in turn encouraged others to follow suit.

First off — it’s worth noting that the statement from Bethann Hardison is spotty at best — particularly when you comprehend how hard she’s fought and continues to fight for equality in the fashion industry — alongside fellow veterans —Iman and honoree Naomi Campbell — who also received the prestigious icon award from the CFDA.

Hardison started off as a model back when it was unfathomable for the industry to regulate itself to the premise of “anything goes” — because that would normalize the ordinary — which isn’t really a very progressive or inspiring method of operation. She was one of the few Black models of the sixties and seventies to enjoy considerable success — and she parlayed that into a career as a booking agent after founding her own agency — which she used as a launching pad for her lifelong commitment to fashion activism.

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Bethann Hardison and Iman

It’s no secret that the fashion and beauty industry has been systematically biased towards Black models — and only indulges when the trends dictate the need for diversion.

When Lupita Nyong’o became an overnight sensation — fashion editors and cosmetic giants embarrassingly celebrated how flawlessly her ethnic features absorbed the ambitious hues of the season — as if her template represented a gorgeous anomaly.

That splashy arrival that welcomed Nyong’o hasn’t yet been replicated by another burgeoning model or actress of African descent — and that has everything to do with the industry’s reluctance to deviate from the trusted White aesthetic — or the heavy reliance on social media platforms like Instagram — that undoubtedly monogrammed its trademark from America’s first family.

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The incurable virus

The era of the supermodel has faded into a perplexing formula that’s crowded with residue from the birthplace of The Kardashians — under the tutelage of matriarch — Kris Jenner — who cleverly translated a disgraceful episode into a culture movement that surpassed anything she could’ve envisioned back when her daughters were White girls.

Kim Kardashian West shamelessly re-invented herself by stealing assets from the Black culture — and assumed the stance that she revolutionized what it means to be a “natural beauty” — despite the high doses of injectables and layers of tanning solution that she uses to weaponize Black women as a mighty “fuck you” to the originals.

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Earlier version of Kim’s explosive booty

It’s beyond deplorable that she’s being rewarded for her thievery —with the support of the OGs who aren’t too old to recall how the industry welcomed their special brand of originality — that wasn’t tainted by the lure of being around the block enough times to dilute the magnificence of an unpolished specimen.

Thanks to the assimilation of Kim Kardashian and her roving replicants — we’re now saddled with magazine covers that are blurred with the interchangeable faces of White girls that are connected to familial dynasties — with interludes from the defaults that provide color — but not too much to drown the recognizable blueprint.

Gone are the days of unearthing hidden gems in their prime during scheduled jaunts in the most spectacular places or even while taking a break at a random mall in Des Moines. We can no longer make dreams come true because there’s simply not enough time or fuel to feed the imagination.

There’s only the assignment of stolen goods and the blandness of amassing enough popularity to woo the attention of withered brands that are holding on by a thread.

The fashion industry is a laughable weakling that isn’t too shy or even ashamed to admit that the past was a sham of a run and now the present belongs to those who couldn’t shape up their lookbook — and therefore resorted to the skill of raping other cultures for the privilege of bullying others with their entitlement.

It’s not fair to give Kim Kardashian West all that power by thanking her for finally bringing what was once regarded as an unshakable establishment that took itself way too seriously — to its knees — but here we are — and there’s no denying the loud roar of cowardly lions.

When Diane von Furstenberg casually declares that “we can’t ignore this world” — it’s a jarring signal that those who spent their time ignoring the world while existing in the paradise that all of us wanted access to by any means necessary — are now ready to be replaced with the sensibilities that would’ve balked at the sight of anything resembling “a Kardashian.”

Just as we welcome the challenges of having a White supremacist with a filthy mouth and sour disposition as president — we also have to entertain this polluted climate — that demands excellence and accolades before we even comprehend the scope of our talents — because that development demands the approval of followers — our current lifeblood.

The forecast for an industry that used to be relentless about forecasting is actually quite bright. The mighty will fall — and it will be quite a steep drop from the top.

The Kardashians will eventually get tired of being Black and try to revert back to what is no longer available. Trends will come and go and ultimately get stuck in neutral.

And the generations that were born to restore original settings will take over — and aggressively find ways to make an ailing community strong from the inside out — beginning with the dare to dream and the death of numbers.

Written by

Juggling Wordsmith. I have a lot to say! https://medium.com/membership https://www.patreon.com/Ezziegirl

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